Conceived in the Back of a Model T Ford

Here’s What You Need To Remember: The T28 never saw combat. How would it have fared if it had? Its 105-millimeter cannon would have been sufficient to take out German pillboxes—and tanks as well. But more important for the U.S. Army in 1945, the T28’s foot-thick frontal armor would have rendered it proof against dreaded German antitank guns like the eighty-eight-millimeter.

When it comes to tanks, America can only hope that size isn’t everything.

During World War II, Germany had its armored giants, such as the seventy-ton King Tiger, the 188-ton Maus or the never-built P.1000, a thousand-ton behemoth that waddled across the line between ambition and insanity. For their part, the Soviets fielded regiments of fifty-six-ton JS-2 heavy tanks.
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There is no way Mount Rushmore can survive the insurgency of left-wing domestic terrorism currently unfolding in our country.

We have crossed the Rubicon and there is no going back, no putting the toothpaste back in the tube.
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Using Coronavirus as an excuse, the US Navy has, effectively, confined all sailors to their barracks or bases for the foreseeable future.
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SAN FRANCISCO, California (AP) — A federal judge on Friday said he was approving a $58 billion plan by the nation’s largest utility to end a contentious bankruptcy saga that began after Pacific Gas & Electric’s outdated equipment ignited wildfires in California that killed more than 100 people, wiped out entire towns and led the company to confess to crimes driven by its greed and neglect.

The decision by U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Dennis Montali clears the way for PG&E to pay $25.5 billion for losses from devastating fires in 2017 and 2018. The judge said he will sign the formal order confirming PG&E’s plan late Friday or Saturday after the company’s lawyers make a few minor revisions worked out during a two-hour hearing.
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Released to the public on October 1, 1908, and continuing in production until May 26, 1927, Henry Ford’s Ford Model T is credited with changing the foundational culture of American life and the world.

Though the first Ford Model T rolled off the factory lot 105 years after the internal combustion engine-powered car was first designed in 1803, and some 19 years after the four-cycle, gasoline-powered car was first produced, it was Henry Ford’s “Tin Lizzie” that is credited with transforming the automobile from some exotic toy of the uber-rich into a staple of American culture.
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