The United States’ technological dominance gives it an immense power

MORROW, Ohio (WKRC) — Some local high school football players are finding that their support for first responders is coming at a huge cost.

The boys are now suspended from their team after not heeding a warning to leave the Thin Blue Line and Thin Red Line flags that represent fallen firefighters and police officers off the field.
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EPHRATA, Pa. — A couple in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is getting a lot of attention after they found tens of thousands of dollars in cash.

Mark and Alicia Steffy, owners of Steffy’s Towing in Ephrata, salvage abandoned vehicles as part of their business. Over the years, they have found personal items in some of the cars and tried to find the rightful owners.
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CLARKSVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — A former Army medic at Fort Campbell will spend the next 15 years behind bars after pleading guilty to the rape and murder of one of his infant twin daughters.

According to our news partners at Clarksville Now, 25-year-old Christopher Paul Conway was charged with two counts of first-degree murder in perpetration of a felony, aggravated rape of a child, and aggravated child abuse and neglect in early 2018.
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WASHINGTON, D.C. (AP) — A panel of government health advisers said Friday there’s no clear evidence that a harder-to-crush version of the painkiller OxyContin designed to discourage abuse actually resulted in fewer overdoses or deaths.

The conclusion from the Food and Drug Administration advisory panel comes more than a decade after Purdue Pharma revamped its blockbuster opioid, which has long been blamed for sparking a surge in painkiller abuse beginning in the 1990s.
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Don’t you just love Paul Krugman? One of loudest of the many anti-Trump hysterics employed by the New York Times, the former economist has been a reliable source of comedy at least since election night 2016. Once the worst was certain and the world learned that Donald Trump had indeed been elected president of the United States, Krugman pondered the markets, which had plunged overnight. “When might we expect them to recover?” he asked. “A first-pass answer is never . . . So we are very probably looking at a global recession, with no end in sight.”

What a card! I think we all deserve a Nobel Prize in economics. If Krugman can snag one, why not Stanley down at the bar? He says a lot of stupid things, too.

Krugman never disappoints. On Thursday, September 3, he published an opinion piece in the Times called “Trump and the Attack of the Invisible Anarchists.” The burden of the piece was twofold. On the one hand, having picked up that week’s propaganda memo from Democratic National Committee headquarters, he parroted the new talking point about the riots ripping (Democratic) cites apart.
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The United States’ technological dominance gives it an immense power. But how long will that last?

China “plans to dominate the world’s digital infrastructure,” Attorney General William Barr has declared. A “truly Orwellian surveillance state” is just around the corner, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo argues. In fields from facial recognition to artificial intelligence to 5G telecom technology, it often seems like China has already become the world’s technology superpower.

But dig deeper and China’s position looks weaker. Take Huawei, which the Trump administration argues exemplifies Beijing’s unfair state subsidies and corporate espionage. The company also represents the best of Chinese tech: It has capable products at competitive prices, and its smartphones and 5G equipment have found willing customers worldwide.

Huawei also illustrates China’s deep dependence on foreign — especially American — technology. As of Sept. 15, new Commerce Department regulations make it almost impossible for any company to sell Huawei computer chips without a license from the American government. But China cannot produce most of the essential advanced chips on its own. Beijing’s reliance on American tech demonstrates the United States’ extraordinary economic power — and how America’s slipping technological edge puts this power at risk.

Today’s advanced computer chips cannot be designed or manufactured without American tech. American firms like Cadence Design Systems and Lam Research make products that are all but irreplaceable. By cutting off access to these products and the chips they produce, the Commerce Department can halt the operations of almost any tech company worldwide.

Even companies outside the United States therefore must follow these new rules. ASML, a Netherlands-based company that is the world’s only maker of the most advanced photolithography machines that use particles of light to carve circuits onto silicon wafers, has stopped selling its most advanced equipment to China. TSMC of Taiwan, one of the world’s leading producers of semiconductors, has said it will halt production for Huawei after the Commerce Department regulations take force.

Access to chips is crucial to any tech company — and Huawei has admitted it is already running out. Without chips, “What products can we still make?,” a Huawei employee has asked. The answer: not much. Fearing further pressure from the United States and seeing little hope for the future, some of Huawei’s top employees have already left the company. Huawei insists that it will soldier on. But it is hard to see how the company’s main products — like 5G equipment, network gear, smartphones and cloud computing services — will survive without access to chips.

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